Tomar notas en papel versus tomar notas en teclado

“Two psychological scientists, Pam Mueller of Princeton and Daniel Oppenheimer of UCLA, wondered if laptops, despite their plusses, might lead to a shallower kind of cognitive processing, and to lower quality learning. They decided to test the old and the new in a head-to-head contest. (…)


Mujeres tomando nota. Fuente Wikipedia. Algunos derechos reservados.

The findings, which Mueller and Oppenheimer describe in a forthcoming issue of the journal Psychological Science, were a bit surprising. Those who took notes in longhand, and were able to study, did significantly better than any of the other students in the experiment—better even than the fleet typists who had basically transcribed the lectures. That is, they took fewer notes overall with less verbatim recording, but they nevertheless did better on both factual learning and higher-order conceptual learning. Taken together, these results suggest that longhand notes not only lead to higher quality learning in the first place; they are also a superior strategy for storing new learning for later study. Or, quite possibly, these two effects interact for greater academic performance overall.” – Wray Herbert.

Ver artículo completo. Ver texto de Muller y Oppenheimer.

Deja un comentario

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada. Los campos obligatorios están marcados con *